Friday, 12 July 2019

Red Box Quarter UPDATED !!

For the last update click the link below ! 


So what is new in the land and building's of Blackpool ...

July 2019 

New investment proposals for Blackpool's Grade II listed former Post Office have been unveiled which would see the historic building converted to a 102 bedroom hotel.

A revised planning application for the site between Abingdon Street and Edward Street, which also include the town's former sorting office, has been lodged with Blackpool Council.
It is the third set of proposals to be submitted for the building by developer Joe Thompson of Thompson Contracts who bought the landmark in 2015.

The latest vision would see some demolition of less significant buildings at the rear of the property, and the construction of two three storey extensions including one with a roof terrace over Abingdon Street.

The hotel would be created in the upper floors with an entrance from Edward Street and a ground floor restaurant.
Ancillary uses for the building include a bar, shops, offices and further restaurants with car parking inside the courtyard for 46 vehicles.

The proposals would see the eight phone boxes at the front of the Post Office, which are also Grade II listed, retained while historic features including the windows would be restored.
Mr Thompson said: "We have elected to go for a scheme with less enabling and modification works than the previous application.

"There has been a variety of interest in both aspects (commercial, likely leisure operator, in Abingdon Street and a hotel in Edward Street) but, we’ve decided not to kick off any active marketing of the development until the planning is passed.
"Blackpool Council has continued to be supportive of our plans and we hope to put the landmark site back into beneficial use as soon as possible."

A design statement says the aim is to "enhance the strong presence of the original Post Office and sorting office buildings by the addition of relatively simple, visually ‘light’ building forms within the inner courtyard.

"The creation of the raised plaza area with canopied perimeters, allows the focus to be on the two main buildings, whilst screening the existing irregular and smaller buildings to the north and south. "

Developer Mr Thompson's first proposal for the building included a 50-bedroom hotel which gained planning permission in November 2016.
The scheme was then ditched in favour of fresh plans approved in November 2017 for a retail scheme called the Red Box Quarter.




 

Saturday, 20 April 2019

Lapis Trip to Lancaster !

Running various social media groups - I tend to share and like a lot of content so was delighted last year to discover the following 


Lancaster Walks, Talks & Tours principal guide is Gregory Wright. With a background in performing arts, and over twenty years experience in the world of tourism, Gregory provides informed historical narratives in an entertaining and memorable manner.
 Bespoke guided walks, illustrated talks and themed tours, exploring the rich history of the City of Lancaster and the surrounding district.

Well I just had to visit and managed to drag along fellow Lapis members Janet and Paul ...

 


Lancaster Castle  is a medieval castle in Lancaster in the English county of Lancashire . Its early history is unclear, but may have been founded in the 11th century on the site of a Roman fort overlooking a crossing of the River Lune . In 1164, the Honour of Lancaster including the castle, came under royal control. In 1322 and 1389 the Scots invaded England, progressing as far as Lancaster and damaging the castle. It was not to see military action again until the English Civil War.

The castle was first used as a prison in 1196 although this aspect became more important during the English Civil War. The castle buildings are owned by the Britsih sovereign as the Duke of Lancaster  which leases part of the structure to Lancashire County Council who operate a Crown Court in part of the building. 

Until 2011, the majority of the buildings were leased to the Ministry of Justice as Her Majesty's Prison Lancaster. The Castle was returned to the Duchy's ownership by the Ministry of Justice in 2011. The Castle is now open to the public seven days a week and is undergoing a large-scale refurbishment to allow access to more areas. 




In 79 AD, a roman fort was built at Lancaster on a hill commanding a crossing over the River Lune , Little is known about Lancaster between the end of the Roman occupation of England in the early 5th century and the Norman Conquest in the late 11th century. The layout of the town was influenced by the Roman fort and the associated civilian settlement; the main road through the town was the route that led east from the fort. After the Norman conquest in the second half of the 11th century, Lancaster was part of the Earldom of Northumbria it was claimed by the kings of England and Scotland. In 1092, William II established a permanent border with Scotland further to the north by capturing Carlisle . It is generally thought that Lancaster Castle was founded in the 1090s on the site of the Roman fort in a strategic location. The castle is the oldest standing building in Lancaster and one of the most important. The history of the structure is uncertain. This is partly due to its former use as a prison, which has prevented extensive archaeological investigation.




 I am not going to post about the content of the talk itself as I think you should visit and experience for yourself of course ! Below some more images from the tour...
















Friday, 22 March 2019

Devonshire Road Hospital.... soon to be ?



Image drawn by Brian Hughes

Devonshire Road was a community hospital that offered both inpatient and outpatient facilities to residents of Blackpool and its surrounding areas. The hospital housed the Fylde Coast's Dermatology Services and had a Renal Dialysis Unit, a Rehabilitation Ward, Dermatology Ward and a Clinical Skills Laboratory on site.

1891 Blackpool Isolation Hospital was opened on Devonshire Road on the 7th of July. This original sanatorium, behind the cemetery, was demolished in 1906 after being kept briefly for smallpox isolation. The new hospital was formally opened on the 26th of March on the opposite corner of Devonshire Road and Talbot Road. Still called Blackpool Sanatorium, it soon became known as Devonshire Road Infectious Diseases Hospital until 1954; locals knew it as “The Fever Hospital”. The hospital was finally demolished in 2007.


As some of you know I run the popular group https://www.facebook.com/groups/blackpoolspast/
which has been running for just over 8 years - I came accross the following information and have included names where I can.

Denys Barber  - a friend of mine and a member, he runs the popular free tours around Layton Cemetery, some historical and some rather 'Grisly' ! he had the following to say -   My understanding  is that Devonshire Road Hospital was built to replace the "Sanatorium " which had become surrounded by the ever expanding Layton Cemetery. The reason for the change of location was apparently because the residents at the Sanatorium started to think that they were on a one-way ticket!  Denys also added the following information about a gent who had passed many years ago which had a historical connection - 2nd aug 2016 - George Washington Williams died in Blackpool on this day in 1891, aged just 42. He was a veteran of three U.S. wars, and on leaving the Army went to University to study theology. He then became a Baptist Minister, and found time to write several books and establish a newspaper of which he eventually became the editor. 

An early Civil Rights activist, George Williams visited the Belgian Congo where he saw the local population virtually enslaved and very poorly treated. Registering his feelings in person to King Leopold he was banned from Belgium and its colonies for life. On a visit to England he contracted T.B. and pleurisy and was sent to Blackpool for treatment but sadly died after a few weeks. Rev. Samuel Pilling and the Blackpool Baptist congregation who had befriended George Williams during his short stay in Blackpool paid for his burial at Layton and the Afro-American community of the U.S.A. provided a stone for his grave in Layton Cemetery in 1976. (Google picture + denys )

Geoff Luxton Never knew of any kids who ventured into there because we always thought we would get death disease..

Denys  - Over 100 children died in a meningitis outbreak in the early 20th century and their little bodies piled into a pit in Layton Cemetery.

 Antony Mugford That's horrible. No separate funerals 
Denys Barber I've heard little about his appalling incident Antony. All I know is that such outbreaks were all too common in the early history of Blackpool. One of the main reasons must surely have been a desperate shortage of water in the town. It was only in July 1864 that the first piped water arrived and then only to a few houses. Residents were told to whitewash their properties once a year to control infectious diseases! Sadly in the case of the Children's Grave in Layton Cemetery there is no stone to record the incident and to my knowledge no record of the names of the children who lie there.

Moss Side Infectious Diseases Hospital (later known as Fylde Isolation Hospital) was opened on the 14th of April near Lytham, relieving pressure on Blackpool. Building was begun in June 1900, by the contractor S Wilson of St Anne’s. It was the first joint Infectious Diseases Hospital in Lancashire. The typhoid and diphtheria pavilion was nearest the road and had 4 wards – one for each sex for each disease. The scarlet fever pavilion was behind this and could take 11 patients of each sex. The nurses’ home and administration blocks were to the south east, together with various support services. There was a porter’s lodge at the main gates. 

 
From the NHS take-over in 1948, Moss Side dealt with long-term orthopaedic patients, with infectious cases being sent to Devonshire Road in Blackpool, and in later years the old scarlet fever ward was used to provide continuation beds for Victoria Hospital. In March 2013 Blackpool Council agreed for usage for the contractors working on the Talbot Gateway project. They say that parking will ease up the other car parks in the area, I am not going to state the obvious with car parks and the debate in the town thou! The land will be leased from the Lancashire Care NHS Foundation Trust for five years, with an option to pull out after two years, at an annual rent of £85,000. In 2017 - Temporary site for the work on the railway electrification project.

So fast forward to 2019 - Maple Grove Developments has completed the acquisition of a former hospital site in Blackpool for £1.05m. The plot was home to Devonshire Road hospital before it was decommissioned in 2007 and then demolished. Recently, it has been let to the council and used as a car park until the lease expired in 2016. It has been bought from Lancashire Care NHS Foundation Trust (LCFT).


Saturday, 2 March 2019

Trains & Signal's ....





Red Box Quarter !




Old and new...

The RED BOX Quarter is set within a substantial and attractive Grade II listed former Post Office and Royal Mail delivery building set on a site of 0.93 acres. The name has been taken from its former use and the existing red phone boxes to its entrance.
The former Post Office has a Renaissance style fa├žade fronting on to Abingdon Street and has retained its charm with many existing features both internally and externally. This provides the main entrance into the new retail and leisure development.

From the brilliant https://liveblackpool.info/about/town-centre/blackpool-post-office/ office of Jane Littlewood ..we have the following from 2018

Blackpool Post Office is set for a transformation. New life is to be breathed into the old building as it’s developed into the Red Box Quarter.
New designs were revealed in January 2018, showing how Blackpool’s former main Post Office could be transformed into a contemporary shopping and leisure hub.

The revised proposals for the Grade II listed building on Abingdon Street – now called the Red Box Quarter – have been formally approved by planners. The name has been taken from the well loved row of red phone boxes which will be retained at the entrance. To the rear of the building is Edward Street and there’s an in internal courtyard which was used for parking.


Plans include a restaurant at plaza level, a rooftop bar on the Edward Street elevation and a mini designer outlet. The original scheme for a 50-bedroom hotel has been shelved.

Lets hope we don't get another fire ...

Two boys aged 13 and 14 are facing a police rap after trespassing and starting a fire at the old Abingdon Street Post Office.

Fire crews had to clamber through windows at the famous building to put out the blaze at 4.20pm on Boxing Day ( 2018 ) 
Witnesses reported a passer-by narrowly escape injury when a glass pane from the building, which was built in 1910, crashed to the pavement below.
When police were alerted, two youths were found inside the property.
They were detained and will be interviewed by police at a later date.
Watch manager Warren Topp, from Forest Gate Fire Station, said four crews attended and they were faced with a difficult job.
He said: “It was an extremely dangerous site as there were parts of the floor missing and holes everywhere. It’s all being ripped out as part of being redeveloped. But if a fire took hold it could still cause a big issue.
True to form with damage in the town nothing was done about the 'children'....


All images/postcards - Juliette W Gregson Photography

Samlesbury Hall - Step back in time ...

Samlesbury Hall is a historic house in Samlesbury, Lancashire, England, six miles (10 km) east of Preston. It was built in 1325 by Gilbert de Southworth (b. 1270), and was the primary home of the Southworth family until the early 17th century.
Samlesbury Hall may have been built to replace an earlier building destroyed during a raid by the Scots, during The Great Raid of 1322. The hall has been many things in its past including a public house and a girls' boarding school, but since 1925, when it was saved from being demolished for its timber, it has been administered by a registered charitable trust, the Samlesbury Hall Trust. This Grade I listed medieval manor house attracts more than 50,000 visitors each year.
Samlesbury Hall is open to the public daily except on Saturdays.





Before being owned by the Southworths, Samlesbury manor belonged to the d'Ewyas family.
Gilbert de Southworth of Warrington acquired half of the manor by marriage to Alice d'Ewyas and is credited with building the Great Hall around 1325. His great-grandson Thomas built the south-west wing. Southworth descendants held their part of the manor until 1677–78, when it was sold by Edward Southworth to Thomas Bradyll. Bradyll never lived at the hall but stripped much of its interior features to use at his main house of Conishead Priory at Ulverston. He then rented the hall out to handloom weavers before it was converted into the Bradyll Arms inn in 1830. The next owner was John Cooper, who bought the building in 1850 and leased it to Mrs Mary Ann Harrison as a co-educational boarding school. She established a Pestolozzian Institution at the hall, based on the ideas of the 18th-century Swiss educational reformer Johann Heinrich Pestalozzi. The school was well ahead of its time and in some ways anticipated the better-known Montessori system by about fifty years. 






Joseph Harrison, of Galligreaves Hall, a prominent Blackburn industrialist, substantially renovated the hall after he bought it in November 1862.[ William Harrison, Joseph’s eldest son, lived at the hall until 1879, when he committed suicide. A fall on the ice in January of that year caused traumatic injuries to William’s brain and a leg, resulting in extreme depression. His father, Joseph Harrison, died the next year at Galligreaves Hall, 18 February 1880, "after a prolonged illness".Ownership of the hall then passed to Joseph’s youngest son, Henry, who resided in Blackburn. He was mayor of Blackburn in 1880–81 and became an Honorary Freeman of the Borough.
Although still owned by the Harrisons, the hall was tenanted for a number of years by Frederick Baynes and his family. Baynes was also a mayor of Blackburn, serving from 1896 to 1897. When Henry Harrison died in 1914, the estate of Samlesbury Hall was entailed to his nephew Mr. M. J. C. Johnston, son of Henry’s sister Agnes.
However, the hall had been left empty since 1909 until it was bought in 1924 by a building firm who intended to demolish it and build a housing estate. After money was raised by public subscription, the hall was purchased in 1925 and put in the hands of the Samlesbury Hall Trust, who have managed it since then.









The hall was built with its solar end windows facing east, as was the practice. When the chapel was constructed 140 years later, it too was built to face east. However, when the chapel was connected to the main hall 60 years later, the angle of connection was less than 90° because of the solstice change in the Sun's position over the years. The chapel was originally built by the Southworth family to upgrade the house to a manor house, which had to have a large household, a chapel and priest, a store of fish for Fridays, usually a pond and a water mill and a grain store. Therefore Samlesbury Hall reflects the building styles and religious beliefs from the 14th century to the present day. 


 







Thursday, 24 January 2019

Amazing Graze, United Blackpool and Bobby Ball ...

I was asked tonight would I like to come and take some pictures of an old church ..by my good friend Will Ritchie and owner of  https://thebplbible.co.uk/ Little did I know this would be a surprise with a fantastic old church, ITV television and Bobby Ball !!

Mark was inspired to set up Amazing Graze in 2012 after turning his life around from a background of drink, drugs and petty crime. Within three months, the Christian goodwill group was serving food and preaching gospel to more than 300 rough sleepers per week. They used to meet every Friday and Saturday night at their headquarters on Boothley Road, where they serve up more than 20,000 hearty plates of food to Blackpool’s poorest and most disenfranchised residents. 

All of the group’s volunteers are trained in health and social care and first aid, and are dedicated to supporting homeless people with drug and alcohol problems through every step of their recovery. According to Mark, there are a number of factors contributing to the rise in people coming to his team for help. “This is mainly because we get quite a lot of problems coming in from elsewhere,” he said. “People who come here when they were 12 or 13 with their parents, when they’re 18 with nowhere to go, they think they’ll come to Blackpool, and they find it’s not as nice as they remember.
All of the group’s volunteers are trained in health and social care and first aid, and are dedicated to supporting homeless people with drug and alcohol problems through every step of their recovery. According to Mark, there are a number of factors contributing to the rise in people coming to his team for help. “This is mainly because we get quite a lot of problems coming in from elsewhere,” he said. “People who come here when they were 12 or 13 with their parents, when they’re 18 with nowhere to go, they think they’ll come to Blackpool, and they find it’s not as nice as they remember.

Read more at: https://www.blackpoolgazette.co.uk/our-region/blackpool/soup-kitchen-sees-rise-in-desperate-families-in-blackpool-1-8325652
All of the group’s volunteers are trained in health and social care and first aid, and are dedicated to supporting homeless people with drug and alcohol problems through every step of their recovery. According to Mark, there are a number of factors contributing to the rise in people coming to his team for help. “This is mainly because we get quite a lot of problems coming in from elsewhere,” he said. “People who come here when they were 12 or 13 with their parents, when they’re 18 with nowhere to go, they think they’ll come to Blackpool, and they find it’s not as nice as they remember.

Read more at: https://www.blackpoolgazette.co.uk/our-region/blackpool/soup-kitchen-sees-rise-in-desperate-families-in-blackpool-1-8325652V
All of the group’s volunteers are trained in health and social care and first aid, and are dedicated to supporting homeless people with drug and alcohol problems through every step of their recovery. According to Mark, there are a number of factors contributing to the rise in people coming to his team for help. “This is mainly because we get quite a lot of problems coming in from elsewhere,” he said. “People who come here when they were 12 or 13 with their parents, when they’re 18 with nowhere to go, they think they’ll come to Blackpool, and they find it’s not as nice as they remember.

Read more at: https://www.blackpoolgazette.co.uk/our-region/blackpool/soup-kitchen-sees-rise-in-desperate-families-in-blackpool-1-8325652
All of the group’s volunteers are trained in health and social care and first aid, and are dedicated to supporting homeless people with drug and alcohol problems through every step of their recovery. According to Mark, there are a number of factors contributing to the rise in people coming to his team for help. “This is mainly because we get quite a lot of problems coming in from elsewhere,” he said. “People who come here when they were 12 or 13 with their parents, when they’re 18 with nowhere to go, they think they’ll come to Blackpool, and they find it’s not as nice as they remember.

Read more at: https://www.blackpoolgazette.co.uk/our-region/blackpool/soup-kitchen-sees-rise-in-desperate-families-in-blackpool-1-8325652

However Amazing Graze, which was facing homelessness, has found somewhere new to help Blackpool’s neediest people.
The organisation’s founder Mark Butcher appealed for help finding new premises after the group was asked to leave its base in Boothley Road so repairs can be done.
Now it has been offered the ground floor of a former baptist church in Bolton Street, which means the resort’s most vulnerable people will continue to get the 
help they need







 https://www.facebook.com/unitedblackpool/

Since starting in October United Blackpool have helped to house around 15 people. Assisting getting a number of these people clean from drink and drugs. With the partnership and the aid of Amazing Graze we have continued to support these people once off the street and we intend to keep this number rising. On our weekly outreach missions we have fed over 100 people and handed out around 70 jackets and sets of gloves and scarves.
2019 is a big year for us and we have a lot of plans in the pipeline. We want to carry on raising awareness of the homeless crisis and inspire people to help change our town.
We are all only humans, and we all have full time jobs. We couldn't do any of this without the support of you guys so thankyou for that!
Keep up with your random acts of kindness and keep liking and sharing our posts 



The news will be a relief to those who use the group. Several had voiced worries over the future in recent weeks. And Mark said the plan is to also open on a Wednesday afternoon, so volunteers can help pensioners in the South Shore area too, and not just the homeless population. “We are ecstatic to find a building that meets all our needs,” he said. “We are going to be opening as a community centre as well. “We want to make it more of a community hub, and we want to help locals as well as the homeless.  



Mark said it will cost around £15,000 to transform the building into the centre, with around £4,000 already donated by local businesses and around £600 raised by well-wishers. He said the group hopes to raise the rest through “the local community in labour and parts”, and said: “We need the community to come together and give us what they can. We have had an electrical contractor offer to supply us with lights and fittings. Howdens have offered to fit us a kitchen.” Amazing Graze is planning to leave Boothley Road after its last day, “the last Friday in February”, and re-open “on the first Tuesday in March”, Mark said. Help is now needed to transform the ground floor of the new premises, with a military museum currently there due to move upstairs.


The Building itself has quite the history – Alexandra road congregational church – James Wayman was largely responsible for securing the site for the erection of this church. The Victora congregational church had paid for the ‘tin tabernacle’ which was formally opened in 1891. The current 3 storey building brick built in 1898 on the corner with 48 Bolton Street by then
the name had changed to Alexandra united reformed church and was opened on the 19th January 1900, records also show a rebuild took place in 1908.
A Sunday school, the Wayman Memorial School was built next door in 1912, the church itself was closed in 2016 to be sold for development.  
 


The news will be a relief to those who use the group. Several had voiced worries over the future in recent weeks. And Mark said the plan is to also open on a Wednesday afternoon, so volunteers can help pensioners in the South Shore area too, and not just the homeless population. “We are ecstatic to find a building that meets all our needs,” he said. “We are going to be opening as a community centre as well. “We want to make it more of a community hub, and we want to help locals as well as the homeless.

Read more at: https://www.blackpoolgazette.co.uk/news/amazing-graze-s-new-home-where-it-s-going-to-be-and-why-it-desperately-needs-your-help-1-9554201


Red Box Quarter UPDATED !!

For the last update click the link below !  https://juliettegregsonheritagephotographer.blogspot.com/2019/03/red-box-quarter.html S...